The Venezuelan Crisis: A Proxy Conflict?

In recent years, Venezuela has faced shortages, hectic inflation, and political repression; yet, the United States, Russia and other foreign powers have chosen now to pay acute attention. The U.S. must not fall back upon the historical interventions made in Latin America with the justification of promoting democracy and combating communism. The country must not turn into yet another battleground for Cold War powers.

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Putin Is Testing NATO’s Fortitude

On 25 November 2018, Russian ships carrying elite Spetsnaz soldiers seized two Ukrainian naval gunships, killing of six Ukrainian sailors and capturing thirty more. Tensions between Ukraine and Russia reached a climax last November and have since remained high. As the European Union continues to fracture and as the United States Trump administration continues to hold a soft spot for Russia, future acts of aggression will become more likely.

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Why The Chinese Real Estate Market Is Global Cause For Concern

While China has made considerable strides in aligning its economy more with market principles following Deng Xiaoping’s 1978 reforms, the Chinese government is still heavily involved in many aspects of the economy, particularly the real estate sector. As China faces its slowest growth rate in 28 years, the country’s real estate market could potentially act as the amplifier of initial economic stagnation that may lead to regional and global implications.

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Japan: The Financial Benefactor of Syrian Refugees

Between 2016 and 2018, Japan’s Abe administration has successfully used its economic power to support Syrian refugees globally, providing almost $3b USD to assist refugees and migrants. However, Japan has only recognized six Syrians refugees as of 2015. In the realm of refugee status recognition, there is still much that can be done not only for Syrian refugees, but for all refugees who desire to come to Japan.

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The Ethical Concerns Of Drone And Automated Warfare

Drone warfare has, in recent years, become a tactic that the United States has become increasingly reliant on. Warfare is already brutal and inhumane when people are involved, and deploying tools of war that can’t discern between threats and innocents will only worsen this.

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Xi and Bun: The Chinese President's Ordinary Meal Turned Extraordinary

A politician’s choice of meal and his table manners are revealing of his habits, personality, and mindset. In 2013, Xi Jinping’s unannounced visit to Qinfeng Restaurant, an ordinary chain bun shop in Beijing, surprised the entire nation. While China has since changed significantly and Xi’s public lunch is not likely to repeat, the event continues to remain vivid in Chinese public memory and internet more than five years on.

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Expenditures of Unknowing: Failures in COIN

From Vietnam to Iraq and Afghanistan, United States counterinsurgency policies (COIN) strategy has led to marathons of expensive conflict by failing to balance “winning the hearts and minds of the people” and avoiding being seen as an occupying force. With an understanding of the role of politics and importance of population-centric strategy, perhaps United States counterinsurgency policies should begin to focus mostly on deterrence and negotiation, rather than force and occupation.

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Importance of Human Rights in North Korea Negotiations

In December 2018, the United States Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) imposed sanctions on three senior North Korean officials in response to the regime’s ongoing violation of human rights in accordance with the 2016 North Korea Sanctions and Policy Enhancement Act (NKSPEA). The integration of human rights issues into global security negotiations is an effective foreign policy strategy that both serves as an additional mechanism of containment and a long-term tactic that can transform the norms of oppressive regimes.

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Is the World Seeing a Change in the Will of the People?

Only twenty years ago, democracy was the champion system of the world. Today however, the very countries that are often regarded as the bastions of democracy and liberalism are electing the system’s downfall. So a question arises: do the people no longer want democracy? Or more importantly, is the world seeing a change in the will of the people?

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The Nauru Question: Australia and the South Pacific’s ‘Ring of Steel’

Nauru is the smallest republic in the world, yet its significance towards Australia, New Zealand, and the broader South Pacific region is paramount. The re-opening of the Nauru Regional Processing Centre for refugees in 2016 has proven to be a rather problematic sticking point, offering challenges to local diplomatic relations as well as stimulating international discussion over fundamental questions of human rights. What would happen to Nauru next?

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Indian Citizenship Law Disenfranchises Millions

In July 2018, the Modi government released a draft of the National Register of Citizens as part of the 2016 Citizenship Amendment Bill, which seeks to remove Indian citizenship from individuals who arrived in the country after 2014. The new law effectively stripped four million Assamese residents of Indian citizenship, a targeted move of exclusion and marginalization that should outrage the global community. A broad front is necessary to stop this exclusionary agenda in its tracks, and this will require organizing within India as well as concerted uproar by the global community.

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The Future of the Environment: Sustainability with Chinese Characteristics?

China has achieved an industrial revolution within twenty years that took many Western countries an entire century; yet, this accomplishment has also compacted a century of environmental pollution issues into a mere two decades. An important question to ask is how China — as the world’s next emerging superpower — will balance its sustainability efforts and economic growth.

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Departure of Ambassador Haley and the Future of the United Nations

The legacy of Ambassador Nikki Haley continues to be divided and her departure from the United Nations has left numerous challenges for the new United States ambassador to reform the organization in this increasingly globalized world. But just because the U.N. will need to address these challenges and criticisms, that should not be a reason to abandon our efforts all together.

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The Misunderstood African Diaspora in America

The African diaspora population has been consistently increasing in America, reaching a population of 2.1 million and making up 4.8% of the United States’ total immigrant population in 2015. Given the increasing presence of the African diaspora in the U.S., a central question remains, when will America began to educate itself about Africa and its people?

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U.S Provides Aid to Egypt, Human Rights Abused

By choosing to sideline human rights concerns in an effort to address national security interests, the Trump administration has effectively given Egypt’s government a green light to continue to abuse human rights in the same way they have for years

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The Mediterranean Crisis of Les Misérables

One day more. Another day, another destiny. This never-ending road to Calvary. When I first heard Jean Valjean’s lament, the main character of the acclaimed Broadway musical and Victor Hugo’s masterpiece, I was only a six-year old child that hardly understood what being a refugee implied. Seventeen years later and after having devoted my graduate studies to the analysis of International Relations, I do not only understand the depth of Jean Valjean’s claim, but I can’t help to identify it in every refugee that has arrived at the European coastline since 2011.

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